Home » Posts tagged 'custom humvee'

Tag Archives: custom humvee

Future-Proofing the Military Humvee

After decades of whisking soldiers across vast expanses of sand and urban taxi duty in the world’s most dangerous cities, the Humvee is still the military vehicle of choice. The JLTV may be optimized for the next big fight, but for now the services will continue to buy tens of thousands of Humvees. For more information, click the link https://www.streetlegalexports.com/ provided to proceed.

HISTORY

For decades, the military Humvee has conquered foreign battlefields and suburban soccer fields alike. Today, however, it faces a major crossroads. With gas prices sky high and warfare evolving, does this iconic vehicle still fulfill the military and civilian missions for which it was designed?

In 1983, the Army began looking for a replacement for its jeeps. At the time, they were past their prime and unable to handle a growing roster of weapons and communications equipment. Several manufacturers responded with prototypes, but AM General’s design — later called the High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle, or HMMWV — stood out from the rest. It was long enough to carry more soldiers, tall enough to drive over 60″ of water yet squatty and stable enough to resist tipping in extreme off-road conditions, powerful enough to haul weapons and support a crew, and capable of resisting small arms fire and roadside improvised explosive devices (IEDs).

The HMMWV won the contract and entered service in 1985. It soon proved its worth in the Gulf War and the invasion of Panama, and it served in front-line duty throughout the 1990s and early 2000s. While the Army has since begun replacing Humvees in front-line service with the Joint Light Tactical Vehicle, it’s important to note that its many roles will continue for decades.

Humvees are highly customizable and can easily transform into cargo haulers, troop transport vehicles, or field ambulances. Depending on the need, they can even be equipped with different powertrains and drivelines for specific tasks. In addition, they’re easy to maintain and repair with common parts. Despite their ruggedness, they’re not as impervious to damage as some might think. That’s why it’s crucial to understand what the pitfalls are when buying one.

PERFORMANCE

The military humvee (abbreviated as HMMWV or Hummer) is a four-wheel drive workhorse for our nation’s fighting forces. The vehicle largely replaced original jeeps and other military light utility vehicles, and it’s been used in every war since the Persian Gulf War in 1991. In fact, the military still uses thousands of HMMWVs worldwide, and they’re constantly looking at ways to make them safer and faster than ever.

In 1979 the Army issued a draft specification for an entirely new military vehicle to replace its aging jeeps. They awarded contracts to AM General, Chrysler Defense and Teledyne Continental for the design of prototypes that could withstand the demands of the modern battlefield. The resulting HMMWV, nicknamed the Humvee, was a massive success. It’s a tough, versatile vehicle that’s used across the globe, and it’s inspired countless civilian-grade spinoffs like the Hummer H1.

One of the biggest problems that has plagued the military humvee is its inability to withstand roadside bombs. A new version of the vehicle addressed this issue, but it also made the humvee much heavier. The end result was a vehicle that was less capable off-road, and it took longer than expected to get up to speed on the highway.

The current generation of HMMWVs is a lot better at handling roadside bombs and other threats than its predecessors, but the military is always looking for ways to improve it. It’s already working on a hybrid-electric light tactical vehicle that it hopes will be more powerful than the Humvee and easier to maintain. The HUMVEE Charge utilizes Commercial-Off-The-Shelf (COTS) technology to combine a traditional internal combustion engine with an electric motor and battery pack.

POWER

The military Humvee has served the Army well for years, but it’s starting to look a little long in the tooth. As field equipment, armor and gunnery have evolved to the point where a fully-loaded HMMWV can easily tip the scales at double its original design weight, that 115 horsepower suddenly seems a bit lacking. That’s why the hot-rodders at Banks Power in Southern California are introducing an electrified diesel Humvee powertrain that they think can future-proof this iconic light utility vehicle.

Back when it first went on sale, the Army’s HMMWV—a mouthful of consonants that even irreverent GIs couldn’t pronounce without sounding like a bad episode of The Office—was a formidable beast. It could smash miles of desert with ease, and it looked so cool that civilians couldn’t get enough of it as well.

But then the battlefield began to evolve, and the Humvee’s greatest challenge wasn’t the desert but paved city streets. The truck’s aluminum body might have looked tough but it was a paperweight in the face of small arms fire and roadside improvised explosive devices.

So in 1979, the Army issued a request for proposal to develop a new tactical vehicle that could take on the demands of a changing battlefield. AM General, Chrysler Defense and Teledyne Continental submitted design proposals, and after rigorous testing and revisions, the Army awarded them contracts to build prototypes of a new High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicle—what we now know as the Humvee. The vehicles were designed to be quickly configurable into three different configurations: weapon carrier, utility vehicle and field ambulance. They could be slung from the back of C-130 Hercules transport aircraft or dropped by helicopter. They were also designed to be easily transported between bases, with a full-sized one capable of fitting inside the cargo hold of a C-5A Galaxy transport plane.

COMFORT

HMMWVs have a very spartan interior with few creature comforts such as air conditioning. It is important for military humvees to be able to carry a lot of equipment and to be able to take a beating from enemy fire, which is why they are not designed for comfort. They are not very comfortable to drive on smooth roads either. The suspension is pretty harsh and you will likely need to visit a chiropractor regularly after driving one for long periods of time.

However, if you are looking for a comfortable ride on the highway or off-road, you can add a soft top or some aftermarket shocks. The Humvee has huge 37-inch tires that will help to cushion the blow from rough terrain. These tires are also able to provide traction on slippery surfaces. The Humvee is also designed to be a high-riding vehicle, which will help it to better avoid damage from roadside bombs or other obstacles.

The Humvee is very easy to maintain, with 15 configurations sharing a common engine and chassis and 44 parts that can be used in multiple positions. This makes it easier to train mechanics on the vehicles and reduces maintenance costs. It also scores high marks on the Army’s Reliability, Availability and Maintainability (RAM-D) ratings.

If you want to buy a military humvee, it’s best to check with your local Department of Motor Vehicles to find out what your state’s laws are regarding this type of vehicle. You will probably need to have a special license plate to be able to legally drive it on the highways. You may also need to find out if there are any restrictions when it comes to driving them off-road.

VALUE

Military Humvees are a great investment because they’re durable, reliable, and can last for a long time if maintained properly. They can also handle a lot of rough weather and terrain, making them perfect for off-road driving. However, like any other vehicle, it’s important to know what you’re getting into before you decide to invest in one. Depending on how you plan to use it, a military Humvee will require a significant amount of maintenance and can be expensive to own.

Unless you’re a member of the Army, Navy, or Air Force, buying a military humvee as a civilian is going to be pretty difficult. You’ll need to jump through a lot of hoops to get it street legal, and even then you’ll probably be limited to using it on private property and off-road trails. Fortunately, there are some companies that specialize in helping people buy and legally register Humvees.

To avoid the hassle and expense of buying a military humvee as an individual, you can always choose to purchase a military surplus one from an auction site. These vehicles are a little more affordable, but you’ll still need to jump through a lot of hoops before you can drive it on public roads. In addition, you’ll need to budget for a lot of additional expenses such as repairs, insurance, and fuel.